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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Motor Controller on

These are the instructions on how to solder the RTK-000-001 Kit up ready for use. These instructions apply for both the kits on their own and the kits packaged with the robots as they are identical. From the 4th of April 2016 all new orders by Ryanteck LTD. include the new Version 3 Board. Tools Required: The following tools are required for assembly: Soldering Iron (30W or above is recommended) with a...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Motor Controller on

Ryanteck Motor Controller Board Version 3! The wiring instructions can be found on the page below listed Labelling diagram. The board uses BCM GPIO 17 & 18 for motor 1 and BCM GPIO 22 & 23 for Motor 2. We recommend looking at the latest tutorials for the language you wish to use on how to program. Languages like python have GPIO Zero which has documentation on how to use....

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

Currently we don't have tutorials on how to do this as we do not have any apple mac based devices ourselves. Auto Finder We have found that the auto launcher designed for linux also works with Mac OSX. Just run the following command the it should download and setup an auto launcher for you. "curl -OL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/modmypi/RPiDebugClip/master/RpiDebugClipInstaller && sudo python debuginstaller" You can find more information about it on the linux installer page.  ...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

In this guide we will show you how to install drivers on Windows 8 for the Raspberry Pi Debug Clip. This is done automatically in windows 7 and 10. Installation Guide Step 1 - Connecting the clip Begin by pushing the clip onto your Raspberry Pi and then plug in the USB cable between your Pi and Computer. Windows should now Pop-up a message saying that it is installing drivers like below however...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

This tutorial was done on Windows 7, as long as you've first followed our driver installation guide for Windows 8 then the rest will be the same. We've also had it reported that the same guide works first time for Windows 10 without having to install any extra drivers first. Step 1 Begin by having your Raspberry Pi's SD card flashed with the latest version of the Raspbian Operating System and then push the...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

This is the tutorial page for connecting your debug clip via a Linux based machine, a majority of this tutorial is the same with slight modifications on the distribution used. Ours covers Ubuntu which also covers a majority of Debian distributions such as Mint. However the auto installer is designed to work with almost all major distributions. Auto Installer Method We've created a python script that can be downloaded using the following command. The...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

The Raspberry Pi Debug Clip is able to be used with android devices that support USB OTG. For this tutorial I will be using my Nexus 7 2012 which is running android 5.1 You can usually find out if your device supports OTG by Googling your model number. Launching the terminal Step 1 First begin by pushing the debug clip onto your Raspberry Pi. Next connect the USB cable between the debug clip...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

This guide will show you step by step how we recommend to solder the debug clip with ease. If you prefer to solder components in a different order then that's fine! This is how we found it the easiest to solder without much trouble. Checking Components Your kit should include the following: 1 - RTK-000-006 PCB 1 - MCP2221 Chip 1 - 0.5A Polyfuse (Yellow component that looks more like a capacitor) 1...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

Operating Systems We have tested the debug clip to be compatible with Raspberry Pis running the following operating systems. Operating System Version Tested On Compatible? Work Around? Raspbian Via IMG 2015-05-05 2015-06-08 Yes N/A Raspbian Via NOOBs   To be tested Unknown   Ubuntu Mate 15.04 2015-06-08 No Unknown ArchLinux ARM         Pidora 2014 R3    ...

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in RyanTeck, RyanTeck Debug Clip on

The Raspberry Pi Debug Clip is an alternative to the UART Debug cables for Raspberry Pi, It provides a serial USB console for your Raspberry Pi to your computer and makes it ideal for multiple situations. It also features a power jumper to allow you to either power your Raspberry Pi via the USB port on your computer or another power source such as the battery bank on your robot. Here's a few use cases...

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in Tutorials on

If you find your WiFi mouse acting very slow, or even "rubber banding", theres a simple fix! The Raspberry Pi's USB poll rate for mice has been set slightly on the slow side, which has been causing issues with WiFi mice. By increasing the poll rate you can speed up and smooth out the laggy mouse movement. However it does come at a slight cost to CPU performance. To change the poll rate simply edit...

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in Tutorials on

Use with the Raspberry Pi 3 and Zero W To get serial working over GPIOs 14 & 15 you have two options. Disable Bluetooth completely or move Bluetooth to the mini-UART. Disable Bluetooth If you don’t need to use Bluetooth the easiest option is to simply disable it. To do this edit the boot config file: sudo nano /boot/config.txt And add the following line: dtoverlay=pi3-disable-bt Then run the following command: sudo systemctl...

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in Tutorials on

If you want to detect an "output" with your Raspberry Pi, like a button being pressed or a motion sensor detecting movement, we can configure our Raspberry Pi's GPIO pin as an "input". That input pin can be in three states (known as Tri-State logic); "high", when 3.3V is applied, "low", when the pin is connected to 0V, and "floating" when the state is undefined. Floating voltages are troublesome in electronics as the input can...

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in Tutorials on

If you want to detect an "output" with your Raspberry Pi, like a button being pressed or a motion sensor detecting movement, we can configure our Raspberry Pi's GPIO pin as an "input". That input pin can be in three states (known as Tri-State logic); "high", when 3.3V is applied, "low", when the pin is connected to 0V, and "floating" when the state is undefined. Floating voltages are troublesome in electronics as the input can...

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