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Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” Phase 4: Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” in Linux environment In Phase 3 we talked about using TEMPerHUM temperature & humidity sensor in Linux GUI (graphical user interface)(graphical user interface). Now for those of you who prefer Linux CLI (command line interface), it would be needed to produce (or as it is said in Linux terminology, to make) an appropriate executable file by yourself because...

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Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” Phase 3: Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” in Linux environment As we discussed in Phase 1 & 2, it was possible to use TEMPerHUM on a Microsoft Windows -based computer without any software, thankfully to the hardware’s ability to send monitored data to an empty file that was previously opened in the Windows’ OS foreground. To activate monitoring the temperature and humidity, it was enough to press the “TXT” button on the sensor device....

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Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” Phase 2: Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” in Windows XP environment As we discussed in Phase 1, it was needed to have .NET Framework installed on a Microsoft Windows based computer in order to install PCsensor’s software TEMPerHUM. However, some users might not want to install that software, but instead to use the TEMPerHUM hardware’s ability to send monitored data to an empty file that was previously opened in the Windows’ foreground. (Why the...

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Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” Phase 1: Testing PCsensor's “TEMPerHUM” in Windows XP environment At first I wanted to test this sensor device in Microsoft Windows environments for which the producer dispatched an end-user software, named also TEMPerHUM, in its version 25.6 that at the time (mid-2017) was sent on a mini-CD alongside with the sensor in the box. For that purpose I used an old test desktop computer that was configured for dual-boot with Linux and...

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If you want to detect an "output" with your Raspberry Pi, like a button being pressed or a motion sensor detecting movement, we can configure our Raspberry Pi's GPIO pin as an "input". That input pin can be in three states (known as Tri-State logic); "high", when 3.3V is applied, "low", when the pin is connected to 0V, and "floating" when the state is undefined. Floating voltages are troublesome in electronics as the input can...

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If you find your WiFi mouse acting very slow, or even "rubber banding", theres a simple fix! The Raspberry Pi's USB poll rate for mice has been set slightly on the slow side, which has been causing issues with WiFi mice. By increasing the poll rate you can speed up and smooth out the laggy mouse movement. However it does come at a slight cost to CPU performance. To change the poll rate simply edit...

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Use with the Raspberry Pi 3 and Zero W To get serial working over GPIOs 14 & 15 you have two options. Disable Bluetooth completely or move Bluetooth to the mini-UART. Disable Bluetooth If you don’t need to use Bluetooth the easiest option is to simply disable it. To do this edit the boot config file: sudo nano /boot/config.txt And add the following line: dtoverlay=pi3-disable-bt Then run the following command: sudo systemctl...

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If you want to detect an "output" with your Raspberry Pi, like a button being pressed or a motion sensor detecting movement, we can configure our Raspberry Pi's GPIO pin as an "input". That input pin can be in three states (known as Tri-State logic); "high", when 3.3V is applied, "low", when the pin is connected to 0V, and "floating" when the state is undefined. Floating voltages are troublesome in electronics as the input can...

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One of the features of our PiOT Relay Board is the ability to activate and deactivate it using a handshake pulse train. This is a neat little feature, however wouldn’t it be nice to know with confidence that when you’ve sent the pulse train that the relay board has indeed activated or deactivated? Well it’s possible! At the cost of one relay… To do this simply wire up one of the relays as shown in...

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PLEASE NOTE: THIS THIRD PARTY PYTHON LIBRARY IS OUT-OF-DATE AND NO LONGER WORKS WITH THE LATEST VERSION OF THE TEMPER SENSORSThe TEMPer USB sensors are super easy to get setup on your Raspberry Pi thanks to a python library available on GitHub. https://github.com/padelt/temper-python Start by installing the required packages: sudo apt-get install python-usb python-setuptools Once that’s installed you can proceed to clone the git to your Pi cd ~ git clone git://github.com/padelt/temper-python.git Once you...

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In this project you will learn how to wire up a Photoelectric IR Through Beam Sensor (HC-89) and write some code to calculate the speed at which a motor is rotating. Things you will need: Raspberry Pi, Micro SD Card, Keyboard & Mouse, Power Supply, HDMI Cable Monitor HC-89 Sensor 3V DC Motor 3V Battery Pack 2 x AA Batteries 3 x...

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Thanks to the FlightAware project you can now transform your Raspberry Pi into an aircraft tracking ADS-B groundstation! Our FlightAware Raspberry Pi Kit can be installed anywhere and receive real-time data directly from airplanes within 100 - 300 miles (depending on antenna). At ModMyPi we've put together a FlightAware Kit, which will get your up an running in no time! If you've purchased our FlightAware Kit, we recommend you fully follow our tutorial for basic setup below....

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Motors are awesome. They are the fundamental components to any robot, be it as a servo motor, stepper motor or just your bog standard DC motor. 9 times out of 10, you’ll be using DC motors for the movement of your robot as they are super easy to control. Apply power to motor… motor rotates. Simple. The cool thing about DC motors is that it doesn’t matter which way round you wire the + and...

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Hooking up your UBEC to your Raspberry Pi really couldn't be easier. Simply plug in the 3 pin socket to your Raspberry Pi's GPIO header; pins 2,4 and 6, making sure the black wire of the UBEC is connected to pin 6. Now all you need to do as apply a source voltage to your UBEC and watch you Pi power up! We did some...

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